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Treasure Island Cruise

Treasure Island Cruise

On Tuesday April 19th, Mike and Nathan took Monica and me on a short cruise to Treasure Island. Why only two people? There were more spots on the boats!

It was a perfect day for sailing: the sun was out and a constant breeze blew gently. When I arrived at the club, Nathan and Monica were already getting the boats ready. I quickly changed into a "highly recommended wetsuit"(Did this mean we were aiming at getting wet?), choosing a sleeveless one because the beautiful conditions made me feel fearless.. I helped out as I could. I am new to the club, and what I like about CSC is that you are expected to quickly learn how to be independent on the water. It's both scary and fun— but today I was being fearless, after all.

Mike arrived and we got going pretty quickly. After a smooth beginning (ideal for nice conversations) the wind intensified a little bit and Nathan and I even rose the spinnaker! I was excited to get on the trapeze, something I remembered doing when I was younger. We arrived at Clipper Cove after noon; perfect timing for our picnic lunch. We took the time to enjoy the delicious chocolate brought by Monica and climbed on top of  the Yerba Buena Island to get a nice view of San Francisco.

The way back brought even more fun with swift wind in our back! I stayed on the trapeze almost all the way to the club, getting half soaked indeed but feeling invigorated. Mike and Monica had some trouble with their spinnaker, but enjoyed a nice speed anyway.

Having to put away the boats was only half-sad. You know why? Because I know I'll be going on another CSC cruise soon! 

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Cargo Cult and the Drudgery of Maintenance

Cargo Cult and the Drudgery of Maintenance

"Early theories of cargo cults began from the assumption that practitioners simply failed to understand technology."

New members often express bright enthusiasm for learning to maintain our equipment.  It's common to hear prospective members say how much they want to fix windsurf boards, sailboats, and other gear.

Which is great.  Maintenance by volunteers is a central part of Cal Sailing Club.  It keeps costs low, it teaches a lot about the equipment, and it's a different kind of fun than sailing in a boat or just watching the water with others.

What is the attraction for these bright-eyed would-be Mr. & Ms. Fixits?  Maybe they think that learning it will enable them to have complete mastery of the equipment--ding-free windsurf boards, sheets that zip through blocks with zero friction, outboards that unfailingly leap to life.  Maybe they think they'll become experts, sail around the world on a tiny budget thanks to their clever repairs, keep a quiver of windsurf boards and sails in tip-top shape for pennies, and be able to take on any repair with complete confidence.

If so, they're right, kind of.  If they hang out long enough and do enough work, they'll get pretty good at fixing stuff, and they'll save money on gear and keep it in better shape.

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Demystifying Apparent Wind - Part 3

The last in the series - Apparent Wind downwind.

It's hard to steer downwind. The waves toss the boat around more, and if you get tossed too much, you'll gybe when you don't want to. You can capsize on a broad reach in heavy winds and seas.

The biggest thing you have to deal with is apparent wind. On a downwind course, small changes in course, wind speed, and wind direction produce large changes in apparent wind.

We'll use the same 5 kt. true wind we've used before and the same Bahia-like boat. You're almost dead downwind - just 5 degrees short of it. Here's what it looks like:

b2ap3_thumbnail_Apparent-Wind-Downwind.gif

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Teaching Upwind Sail Trim

Teaching Upwind Sail Trim

We have a teaching philosophy that is unique. Most sailing schools will do a "ground school" for hours before the students get on a boat. The idea is to explain how it all works, so the  student is prepared intellectually for the experience. Our approach is to get them on the water right away and have them just do it - steer the boat, tack, and get the feel for it.

I believe that our approach is correct, up to a point. You need some practice before the sailing theory makes any sense. And my experience as an instructor is that a beginning student will do just fine steering beam reach, tacking, even steering close-hauled without any discussion of how it all works.

The turning point is when they try to control the tiller and the main sheet at the same time. Lots of confusion, including understanding wind direction. Tacking from beam reach to beam reach and seeming to lose the wind (because the sails are trimmed too tightly).

This is the point where they really need an understanding of how it all works. And that's hard to do on the water. You  need an image to show how it works. I believe it's all pretty simple (or at least
can be explained simply), with a visual from above.

The key concept is that upwind (beam reach and higher) the sail is a wing, it works just like the wing of an airplane. Now an airplane wing has to be at a certain angle to the wind, or it doesn't work. Same with a sail. So when you're trimming the sail going upwind, you're keeping the sail at the same angle to the wind all the time.

Let's see what this looks like from above on several points of sail - close hauled, close reach,  and beam reach (click on the diagram to start the animation):

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Sail-Trim.gif

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Michael Sherrell
This animation is really cool, John. I just wish there was a way to summon it up at will while in the clubhouse during the pre-lau... Read More
Thursday, 19 November 2015 07:14
John Bongiovanni
I agree. In fact, I have just such a model (and a wind diagram) in my car. I used it today to explain slow-sailing on land. I mad... Read More
Thursday, 19 November 2015 16:36
Michael Sherrell
John, if you find some cheap enough at some toy store for example, please pick up one for me and maybe one for the clubhouse. We c... Read More
Thursday, 19 November 2015 20:06
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End of Season/Kid for a Kid party!

End of Season/Kid for a Kid party!

What better way to celebrate Sophie & Tudor bringing a kid into the world than roasting one...a goat that is!

Sophie & Tudor met at CSC a few years ago, got married, and are about to have their first child. It's a true CSC-style love story. Most know Sophie as our fantastic (co-)Port Captain and phenomenal windsurfer. What many may not know is that Sophie got her start at CSC in sailing and taught some of Tudor's first lessons...it's how they met! Sophie's still windsurfing like a boss in her final trimester - who would expect any less?

We hosted a party for Sophie and Tudor yesterday in celebration of the upcoming newest novice CSC member, along with the requisite delicious food. Oh and a bouncy house. Did we mention the bouncy house? (Pro tip: do not get in the bouncy house right after eating 3 desserts. Just, don't.) 

It's been a phenomenal season filled with lots of epic wind and novice sailors and windsurfers learning how to get around using this wind, thing - time for the deliciously warm months of Fall! :)

 

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